10 Things You Might Not Know About Women Being Sold For Sex

Many say prostitution is the oldest profession in the world and believe the private affairs of consenting adults should not be infringed upon.  Those same people are quick to claim that prostitution does not harm anyone.  Perhaps you are one of those people. If that’s the case, I’d like to suggest to you ten things that you might not know about a women being sold for sex.  Statistically speaking:

  1. She was just 13 years old when she entered into the sex trade.
  2. She is a victim of incest. (65% to 90%)
  3. She is the most raped demographic on the planet. (80%)
  4. She will die within 7 years after entering into prostitution.
  5. She has a trafficker selling her as a commodity and keeping all or most of the money. (70%-90%)
  6. She is or has been homeless. (72%)
  7. At some point she has considered suicide. (75%)
  8. She is 40 times more likely to die than the national average.
  9. She is two times more likely than a solider in a war zone to have Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. (68%)
  10. She is classified by the US Center for Disease Control as having the highest HIV prevalence in the United States.

 

Learn Ten Things About Men Who Buy Sex.

Learn Ten Things About Porn.


Bridget Battistoni is Director of Operations for REST: Real Escape from the Sex Trade
Sources:
1 Estes, Richard J. and Neil A. Weiner. The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. The University of Pennsylvania School of Social Work: 2001
2 The Council for Prostitution Alternatives, Portland, Oregon Annual Report in 1991 stated that: 85% of prostitute/clients reported history of sexual abuse in childhood; 70% reported incest.
3 Susan Kay Hunter and K.C. Reed, July, 1990 “Taking the side of bought and sold rape,” speech at National Coalition against Sexual Assault, Washington, D.C.
4 FBI, 2011
5 Barry, 1995; Norton-Hawk, 2004; Silbert & Pines, 1983b; Williamson & Cluse-Tolar, 2002.
6 Prostitution in Five Countries: Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder” (1998) Feminism & Psychology 8 (4): 405-426.
7 Sisters Speak Out: The Lives and Needs of Prostituted Women in Chicago. Raphael, Jody, and Deborah L. Shapiro. Center for Impact Research, 2002
8 Chris Grussendorf, “No Humans Involved, Part One”, http://www.catwinternational.org/factbook/usa2_prost.php
9 Melissa Farley, Isin Baral, Merab Kiremire, Ufuk Sezgin, “Prostitution in Five Countries: Violence and Post traumatic Stress Disorder” (1998) Feminism & Psychology 8 (4): 405-426; Farley, Melissa et al. 2003. “Prostitution and Trafficking in Nine Countries: An Update on Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.” Journal of Trauma Practice, Vol. 2, No. 3/4: 33-74; and Farley, Melissa. ed. 2003. Prostitution, Trafficking, and Traumatic Stress. Haworth Press, New York.
10 Common Ground. (n.d.). HYPE: Homeless Youth Peer Education Program. Retrieved July 26, 2007 from http:// www.commongroundwestside.org/homelessyouth.htm.

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